u.s. history

Timeline created by almarodriguez
  • Homestead Act

    Homestead Act
    An individual was given ownership of the land for free if that person lived on the land for five years and improved the land by building a home and producing a crop.

  • 14th Amendment

    14th Amendment
  • Transcontinental Railroad Completed

    Transcontinental Railroad Completed
    On May 10, 1869, a golden spike was driven at Promontory, Utah, signaling the completion of the first transcontinental railroad in the United States. The transcontinental railroad had long been a dream for people living in the American West. ... The two companies met in Promontory to complete the line
  • Industrialization Begins to Boom

    Industrialization Begins to Boom
    A population boom caused people to invent new thecknology
  • 15th Amendment

    15th Amendment
  • Boss Tweed rise at Tammany Hall

    Boss Tweed rise at Tammany Hall
    Tammany Hall, also known as the Society of St. Tammany, the Sons of St. Tammany, or the Columbian Order, was a New York City political organization founded in 1786 and incorporated on May 12, 1789, as the Tammany Society
  • Telephone Invented

    Telephone Invented
    They were spoken by Alexander Graham Bell, inventor of the telephone, when he made the first call on March 10, 1876, to his assistant, Thomas Watson: "Mr. Watson--come here--I want to see you."
  • Reconstruction Ends

    Reconstruction Ends
    The Compromise of 1877 was a purported informal, unwritten deal that settled the intensely disputed 1876 U.S. presidential election. It resulted in the United States federal government pulling the last troops out of the South, and formally ended the Reconstruction Era.
  • • Jim Crow Laws Start in South

    •	Jim Crow Laws Start in South
    Jim Crow law, in U.S. history, any of the laws that enforced racial segregation in the South between the end of Reconstruction in 1877 and the beginning of the civil rights movement in the 1950s.
  • Light Bulb Invented

    Light Bulb Invented
    Joseph Swan demonstrates the electric lamp to the Newcastle Chemical Society in northern England.The incandescent light bulb has become synonymous with Thomas Edison.But Swan was the first to show a more-or-less workable version of this remarkable creation.
  • Third Wave of Immigration

    Third Wave of Immigration
    For its first 100 years, the United States facilitated immigration, welcoming foreigners to settle a vast country.
  • Chinese Exclusion Act

    Chinese Exclusion Act
    The Chinese Exclusion Act was approved on May 6, 1882. It was the first significant law restricting immigration into the United States. In the spring of 1882, the Chinese Exclusion Act was passed by Congress and signed by President Chester A. Arthur.
  • Pendleton Act

    Pendleton Act
    The Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act (ch. 27, 22 Stat. 403) is a United States federal law, enacted in 1883, which established that positions within the federal government should be awarded on the basis of merit instead of political affiliation.
  • Dawes Act

    Dawes Act
    The Dawes Act of 1887 (also known as the General Allotment Act or the Dawes Severalty Act of 1887), adopted by Congress in 1887, authorized the President of the United States to survey American Indian tribal land and divide it into allotments for individual Indians.
  • Interstate Commerce Act

    Interstate Commerce Act
    The Interstate Commerce Act of 1887 is a United States federal law that was designed to regulate the railroad industry, particularly its monopolistic practices. The Act required that railroad rates be "reasonable and just," but did not empower the government to fix specific rates.
  • Andrew Carnegie's Gospel of Wealth

    Andrew Carnegie's Gospel of Wealth
    "Wealth", more commonly known as "The Gospel of Wealth", is an article written by Andrew Carnegie in June of 1889 that describes the responsibility of philanthropy by the new upper class of self-made rich.
  • Chicago’s Hull House

  • Chicago's Hull House

    Chicago's Hull House
    Hull House was a settlement house in the United States that was co-founded in 1889 by Jane Addams and Ellen Gates Starr. Located on the Near West Side of Chicago, Illinois, Hull House (named after the home's first owner Charles Jerald Hull) opened to recently arrived European immigrants
  • Klondike Gold Rush

    Klondike Gold Rush
    was a migration by an estimated 100,000 prospectors to the Klondike region of the Yukon in north-western Canada between 1896 and 1899. Gold was discovered there by local miners on August 16, 1896, and, when news reached Seattle and San Francisco the following year, it triggered a stampede of prospectors.
  • Sherman Anti-Trust Act

    Sherman Anti-Trust Act
    The Sherman Antitrust Act (Sherman Act, 26 Stat. 209, 15 U.S.C. §§ 1–7) is a landmark federal statute in the history of United States antitrust law (or "competition law") passed by Congress in 1890 under the presidency of Benjamin Harrison.
  • How the Other Half Lives

    How the Other Half Lives
    How the Other Half Lives: Studies among the Tenements of New York (1890) is an early publication of photojournalism by Jacob Riis, documenting squalid living conditions in New York City slums in the 1880s.
  • How The Other Half Lives

  • Influence of Sea Power Upon History

    Influence of Sea Power Upon History
    In 1890, Captain Alfred Thayer Mahan, a lecturer in naval history and the president of the United States Naval War College, published The Influence of Sea Power upon History, 1660–1783, a revolutionary analysis of the importance of naval power as a factor in the rise of the British Empire.
  • Homestead Steel Labor Strike

    Homestead Steel Labor Strike
    The Homestead strike, also known as the Homestead Steel strike, Pinkerton rebellion, or Homestead massacre, was an industrial lockout and strike which began on June 30, 1892, culminating in a battle between strikers and private security agents on July 6, 1892.
  • Pullman Labor Strike

    Pullman Labor Strike
    The Pullman Strike was a nationwide railroad strike in the United States on May 11, 1894
  • • Plessy v. Ferguson

    •	Plessy v. Ferguson
    Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 U.S. 537 (1896), was a landmark decision of the U.S. Supreme Court issued in 1896. It upheld the constitutionality of racial segregation laws for public facilities as long as the segregated facilities were equal in quality, a doctrine that came to be known as "separate but equal".
  • Annexation of Hawaii

  • Spanish American War

    Spanish American War
    On April 21, 1898, the United States declared war against Spain following the sinking of the Battleship Maine in the Havana harbor on February 15, 1898. The U.S. also supported the ongoing struggle of Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Philippines for independence against Spanish rule.
  • Open Door Policy

    Open Door Policy
    The Open Door Policy is a term in foreign affairs initially used to refer to the United States policy established in the late 19th century and the early 20th century, as enunciated in Secretary of State John Hay's Open Door Note, dated September 6, 1899 and dispatched to the major European powers.
  • Assassination of President McKinley

  • Wright Brother’s Airplane

    Wright Brother’s Airplane
    On December 17, 1903, Wilbur and Orville Wright made four brief flights at Kitty Hawk with their first powered aircraft. The Wright brothers had invented the first successful airplane. The Wrights used this stopwatch to time the Kitty Hawk flights.
  • Panama Canal U.S. Construction Begins

    Panama Canal U.S. Construction Begins
    The Panama Canal (Spanish: Canal de Panamá) is an artificial 48-mile (77 km) waterway in Panama that connects the Atlantic Ocean with the Pacific Ocean. The canal cuts across the Isthmus of Panama and is a key conduit for international maritime trade.
  • The Jungle

    The Jungle
    Muckraking the Meat-Packing Industry. Upton Sinclair wrote The Jungle to expose the appalling working conditions in the meat-packing industry. His description of diseased, rotten, and contaminated meat shocked the public and led to new federal food safety laws.
  • Pure Food & Drug Act

    Pure Food & Drug Act
    Pure Food and Drug Act (1906) For preventing the manufacture, sale, or transportation of adulterated or misbranded or poisonous or deleterious foods, drugs, medicines, and liquors, and for regulating traffic therein, and for other purposes.
  • Model-T

    The Model T was an automobile built by the Ford Motor Company from 1908 until 1927. Conceived by Henry Ford as practical, affordable transportation for the common man, it quickly became prized for its low cost, durability, versatility, and ease of maintenance.

    Founded in 1909, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) was one of the earliest and most influential civil rights organization in the United States.
  • 16 Amendment

    16 Amendment
    Passed by Congress on July 2, 1909, and ratified February 3, 1913, the 16th amendment established Congress's right to impose a Federal income tax.
  • Federal Reserve Act

    Federal Reserve Act
    The Federal Reserve Act (ch. 6, 38 Stat. 251, enacted December 23, 1913, 12 U.S.C. §§ 221 to 522) is an Act of Congress that created and established the Federal Reserve System (the central banking system of the United States), and which created the authority to issue Federal Reserve Notes
  • 17 Amendment

    17 Amendment
    direct elections of U.S. senators
  • Assissination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand

    Assissination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand
    The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, heir presumptive to the Austro-Hungarian throne, and his wife Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, occurred on 28 June 1914 in Sarajevo when they were mortally wounded by Gavrilo Princip.
  • Trench Warfare, Poison Gas, and Machine Guns

    Trench Warfare, Poison Gas, and Machine Guns
    Poison gas was probably the most feared of all weapons in World War One. Poison gas was indiscriminate and could be used on the trenches even when no attack was going on. Whereas the machine gun killed more soldiers overall during the war, death
  • Sinking of the Lusitania

    Sinking of the Lusitania
    When World War I erupted in 1914, President Woodrow Wilson pledged neutrality for the United States, a position that the vast majority of Americans favored. Britain, however, was one of America’s closest trading partners, and tension soon arose between the United States and Germany over the latter’s attempted quarantine of the British isles.
  • National Parks System

    National Parks System
    Protect Parks
  • Zimmerman Telegram

    Zimmerman Telegram
    The Zimmermann Telegram (or Zimmermann Note or Zimmerman Cable) was a secret diplomatic communication issued from the German Foreign Office in January 1917 that proposed a military alliance between Germany and Mexico in the prior event of the United States entering World War I against Germany.
  • Russian Revolution

    Russian Revolution
    Russian Revolution of 1917. Russian Revolution of 1917, two revolutions, the first of which, in February (March, New Style), overthrew the imperial government and the second of which, in October (November), placed the Bolsheviks in power. ... By 1917 the bond between the tsar and most of the Russian people had been broken.
  • U.S. entry into WWI

    U.S. entry into WWI
    On April 2, 1917, President Woodrow Wilson went before a joint session of Congress to request a declaration of war against Germany. Wilson cited Germany’s violation of its pledge to suspend unrestricted submarine warfare in the North Atlantic and the Mediterranean, as well as its attempts to entice Mexico into an alliance against the United States
  • Battle of Argonne Forest

    Battle of Argonne Forest
    The Meuse-Argonne Offensive, also known as the Maas-Argonne Offensive and the Battle of the Argonne Forest, was a major part of the final Allied offensive of World War I that stretched along the entire Western Front. It was fought from 26 September 1918 until the Armistice of 11 November 1918, a total of 47 days.
  • Armistice

    The Armistice of 11 November 1918 was the armistice that ended fighting on land, sea and air in World War I between the Allies and their last opponent, Germany. ... Also known as the Armistice of Compiègne from the place where it was signed, it came into force at 11 a.m.
  • Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points

    Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points
    The Fourteen Points was a statement of principles for peace that was to be used for peace negotiations in order to end World War I. The principles were outlined in a January 8, 1918 speech on war aims and peace terms to the United States Congress by President Woodrow Wilson.
  • Treaty of Versailles

    Treaty of Versailles
    The Treaty ended the state of war between Germany and the Allied Powers. It was signed on 28 June 1919 in Versailles, exactly five years after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. The other Central Powers on the German side of World War I signed separate treaties.
  • 18 Amendment

    18 Amendment
  • 19 Amendment

    19 Amendment
    woman's suffrage (rights)
  • President Harding's Return to Normalcy

    President Harding's Return to Normalcy
    Return to normalcy, a return to the way of life before World War I, was United States presidential candidate Warren G. Harding's campaign slogan for the election of 1920.
  • Harlem Renaissance

    Harlem Renaissance
    The Harlem Renaissance was an intellectual, social, and artistic explosion that took place in Harlem, New York, spanning the 1920s. During the time, it was known as the "New Negro Movement", named after the 1925 anthology by Alain Locke. ... The Harlem Renaissance was considered to be a rebirth of African-American arts.
  • Red Scare

    Red Scare
    The causes of the Red Scare included: ... The Bolshevik Revolution in Russia, which led many to fear that immigrants, particularly from Russia, southern Europe, and eastern Europe, intended to overthrow the United States government; The end of World War I, which caused production needs to decline and unemployment to rise.
  • Teapot Dome Scandal

    Teapot Dome Scandal
    Teapot Dome Scandal, also called Oil Reserves Scandal or Elk Hills Scandal, in American history, scandal of the early 1920s surrounding the secret leasing of federal oil reserves by the secretary of the interior, Albert Bacon Fall.
  • Joseph Stalin Leads USSR

    Joseph Stalin Leads USSR
    Joseph Stalin (1878-1953) was the dictator of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) from 1929 to 1953. Under Stalin, the Soviet Union was transformed from a peasant society into an industrial and military superpower.
  • Scopes "Monkey" Trial

    Scopes "Monkey" Trial
    The Scopes Trial, formally known as The State of Tennessee v. John Thomas Scopes and commonly referred to as the Scopes Monkey Trial, was an American legal case in July 1925
  • Mein Kamp Published

    Mein Kamp Published
    Hitler began composing his tome while sitting in Landsberg prison, convicted of treason for his role in the infamous Beer Hall Putsch in which he and his minions attempted to stage a coup and grasp control of the government in Bavaria. It ended in disaster, with some allies deserting and others falling into the hands of the authorities.
  • Charles Lindbergh's Trans-Atlantic Flight

    Charles Lindbergh's Trans-Atlantic Flight
    Learn about key events in history and their connections to today. On May 21, 1927, the aviator Charles A. Lindbergh landed his Spirit of St. Louis near Paris, completing the first solo airplane flight across the Atlantic Ocean. ... The New York Times described the joyous reactions Lindbergh received in France
  • St. Valentine's Day Massacre

    St. Valentine's Day Massacre
    Fourmen dressed as police officers enter gangster Bugs Moran’s headquarters on North Clark Street in Chicago, line seven of Moran’s henchmen against a wall, and shoot them to death. The St. Valentine’s Day Massacre, as it is now called, was the culmination of a gang war between arch rivals Al Capone and Bugs Moran.
  • Stock Market Crashes "Black Tuesday"

    Stock Market Crashes "Black Tuesday"
    The Wall Street Crash of 1929, also known as Black Tuesday (October 29), the Great Crash, or the Stock Market Crash of 1929, began on October 24, 1929 ("Black Thursday"), and was the most devastating stock market crash in the history of the United States (acting as the most significant predicting indicator of the Great depression
  • Hoovervilles

    A "Hooverville" was a shanty town built during the Great Depression by the homeless in the United States of America. They were named after Herbert Hoover, who was President of the United States of America during the onset of the Depression and was widely blamed for it.
  • Smoot-Hawle Tariff

    Smoot-Hawle Tariff
    otherwise known as the Smoot–Hawley Tariff or Hawley–Smoot Tariff, was an act implementing protectionist trade policies sponsored by Senator Reed Smoot and Representative Willis C. Hawley and signed into law on June 17, 1930. The act raised U.S. tariffs on over 20,000 imported goods.
  • 100,00 Banks Have Failed

    100,00 Banks Have Failed
    In the 1920s, Nebraska and the nation as a whole had a lot of banks. At the beginning of the 20s, Nebraska had 1.3 million people and there was one bank for every 1,000 people. Every small town had a bank or two struggling to take in deposits and loan out money to farmers and businesses.
  • Agriculture Adjustment Administration (AAA)

    Agriculture Adjustment Administration (AAA)
    The Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA) was a United States federal law of the New Deal era designed to boost agricultural prices by reducing surpluses. The Government bought livestock for slaughter and paid farmers subsidies not to plant part of their land. The money for these subsidies was generated through an exclusive tax on companies which processed farm products. The Act created a new agency, the Agricultural Adjustment Administration, an agency of the U.S.
  • Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC)

    Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC)
    Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), independent U.S. government corporation created under authority of the Banking Act of 1933 (also known as the Glass-Steagall Act), with the responsibility to insure bank deposits in eligible banks against loss in the event of a bank failure and to regulate certain banking ...
  • Public Works Administration (PWA)

    Public Works Administration (PWA)
    Created by the National Industrial Recovery Act on June 16, 1933, the Public Works Administration (PWA) budgeted several billion dollars to be spent on the construction of public works as a means of providing employment, stabilizing purchasing power, improving public welfare, and contributing to a revival of American
  • Hitler Appointed Chancellor Of Germany

    Hitler Appointed Chancellor Of Germany
    The year 1932 had seen Hitler’s meteoric rise to prominence in Germany, spurred largely by the German people’s frustration with dismal economic conditions and the still-festering wounds inflicted by defeat in the Great War and the harsh peace terms of the Versailles treaty. A charismatic speaker, Hitler channeled popular discontent with the post-war Weimar government into support for his fledgling Nazi party.
  • Dust Bowl

    Dust Bowl
    The Dust Bowl, also known as the Dirty Thirties, was a period of severe dust storms that greatly damaged the ecology and agriculture of the American and Canadian prairies during the 1930s; severe drought and a failure to apply dryland farming methods to prevent wind erosion (the Aeolian processes) caused the phenomenon ...
  • Social Security Administration (SSA)

    Social Security Administration (SSA)
    The Social Security Administration (SSA) is a U.S. government agency created in 1935 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the SSA administers the social insurance programs in the United States. The agency covers a wide range of social security services, such as disability, retirement and survivors' benefits
  • Rape of Nanjing

    Rape of Nanjing
    The Nanking Massacre was an episode of mass murder and mass rape committed by Japanese troops against the residents of Nanjing (Nanking), then the capital of the Republic of China, during the Second Sino-Japanese War. The massacre is also known as the Rape of Nanking or, using Pinyin romanization, the Nanjing Massacre or Rape of Nanjing.
  • Kristallnacht

    Definition of Kristallnacht. Kristallnacht: Also known as The Night of the Broken Glass. On this night, November 9, 1938, almost 200 synagogues were destroyed, over 8,000 Jewish shops were sacked and looted, and tens of thousands of Jews were removed to concentration camps.
  • Hitler invades Poland

    Hitler invades Poland
    The invasion was referred to by Germany as the 1939 Defensive War since Hitler proclaimed that Poland had attacked Germany and that "Germans in Poland are persecuted with a bloody terror and are driven from their homes. ... Polish leaders also distrusted Hitler.
  • German Blitzkrieg attacks

    German Blitzkrieg attacks
    Germany quickly overran much of Europe and was victorious for more than two years by relying on a new military tactic called the "Blitzkrieg" (lightning war). Blitzkrieg tactics required the concentration of offensive weapons (such as tanks, planes, and artillery) along a narrow front
  • Tuskegee Airmen

    Tuskegee Airmen
    Tuskegee Airmen — 1941 – 1945. The Tuskegee Army Air Field became the vital center for training African Americans to fly fighter and bomber aircraft. ... Called the "Tuskegee Airmen," these airmen made a pioneering contribution to the war and the subsequent drive to end racial segregation in the American armed forces.
  • Navajo Code Talkers

    Navajo Code Talkers
    Code talkers are people in the 20th century who used obscure languages as a means of secret communication during wartime. The term is now usually associated with the United States service members during the world wars who used their knowledge of Native American languages as a basis to transmit coded messages.
  • Pearl Harbor

    Pearl Harbor
    President Franklin Roosevelt called December 7, 1941, "a date which will live in infamy." On that day, Japanese planes attacked the United States Naval Base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Territory. The bombing killed more than 2,300 Americans.
  • Executive Order 9066

    Executive Order 9066
    Executive Order 9066 was a United States presidential executive order signed and issued during World War II by United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt on February 19, 1942.
  • Bataan Death March

    Bataan Death March
    April 9, 1942, after the three-month Battle of Bataan in the Philippines during World War II.
  • Invasion Of Normandy (D-Day)

    Invasion Of Normandy (D-Day)
    Image result for Invasion Of Normandy (D-Day) description
    The Normandy landings (codenamed Operation Neptune) were the landing operations on Tuesday, 6 June 1944 (termed D-Day) of the Allied invasion of Normandy in Operation Overlord during World War II. ... Allied infantry and armoured divisions began landing on the coast of France at 06:30.
  • GI Bill

    GI Bill
    G.I. Bill (of Rights), also called Servicemen's Readjustment Act, U.S. legislation passed in 1944 that provided benefits to World War II veterans.
  • Atomic bombing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima

    Atomic bombing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima
    On August 6, 1945, during World War II (1939-45), an American B-29 bomber dropped the world's first deployed atomic bomb over the Japanese city of Hiroshima. The explosion wiped out 90 percent of the city and immediately killed 80,000 people; tens of thousands more would later die of radiation exposure.
  • Victory over Japan/Pacific (VJ/VP) Day

    Victory over Japan/Pacific (VJ/VP) Day
    Victory over Japan Day (also known as V-J Day, Victory in the Pacific Day, or V-P Day) is the day on which Imperial Japan surrendered in World War II, in effect ending the war. ... On September 2, 1945, a formal surrender ceremony was performed in Tokyo Bay, Japan, aboard the battleship USS Missouri.
  • Liberation of Concentration Camps

    Liberation of Concentration Camps
    Nazi Germany maintained concentration camps (German: Konzentrationslager, KZ or KL) throughout the territories it controlled before and during the Second World War. The first Nazi camps were erected in Germany in March 1933 immediately after Hitler became Chancellor and his Nazi Party was given control of the police by Reich Interior Minister Wilhelm Frick and Prussian Acting Interior Minister Hermann Göring.
  • Victory in Europe ( VE )Day

    Victory in Europe ( VE )Day
    Victory in Europe Day, generally known as V-E Day, VE Day or simply V Day, was the public holiday celebrated on 8 May 1945 to mark the formal acceptance by the Allies of World War II of Nazi Germany's unconditional surrender of its armed forces. ... It thus marked the end of World War II in Europe.
  • United Nations (UN) Formed

    United Nations (UN) Formed
    A replacement for the ineffective League of Nations, the organization was established on 24 October 1945 after World War II with the aim of preventing another such conflict. At its founding, the UN had 51 member states; there are now 193.
  • Germany Divided

    Germany Divided
    In the period after World War II, Germany was divided into four occupation zones, with the British, French, Americans, and Soviets each controlling one zone. The city of Berlin was also divided in a like fashion. ... The Soviets reacted quickly to the action in West Germany.
  • Nuremberg Trials

    Nuremberg Trials
    Nuremberg, Germany, was chosen as a site for trials that took place in 1945 and 1946. Judges from the Allied powers—Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States—presided over the hearings of twenty-two major Nazi criminals. Twelve prominent Nazis were sentenced to death.
  • Truman Doctrine

    Truman Doctrine
    It was first announced to Congress by President Harry S. Truman on March 12, 1947 and further developed on July 12, 1948 when he pledged to contain threats to Greece and Turkey. ... More generally, the Truman Doctrine implied American support for other nations allegedly threatened by Soviet communism.
  • • Mao Zedong Established Communist Rule in China

  • 22nd Amendment

    22nd Amendment
    the president can only serve 2 terms
  • Marshall Plan

    Marshall Plan
    The $17 billion was in the context of a US GDP of $258 billion in 1948, and on top of $17 billion in American aid to Europe between the end of the war and the start of the Plan that is counted separately from the Marshall Plan. ... The plan looked to the future, and did not focus on the destruction caused by the war.
  • Berlin Airlift

    Berlin Airlift
    The Berlin Airlift, 1948–1949. At the end of the Second World War, U.S., British, and Soviet military forces divided and occupied Germany. ... The crisis started on June 24, 1948, when Soviet forces blockaded rail, road, and water access to Allied-controlled areas of Berlin.
  • • Arab-Israeli War Begins

    •	Arab-Israeli War Begins
    The Arab-Israeli War of 1948 broke out when five Arab nations invaded territory in the former Palestinian mandate immediately following the announcement of the independence of the state of Israel on May 14, 1948. In 1947, and again on May 14, 1948, the United States had offered de facto recognition of the Israeli Provisional Government, but during the war, the United States maintained an arms embargo against all belligerents.
  • NATO Formed

    NATO Formed
    The North Atlantic Treaty Organization was created in 1949 by the United States, Canada, and several Western European nations to provide collective security against the Soviet Union. NATO was the first peacetime military alliance the United States entered into outside of the Western Hemisphere.
  • Kim Il-sung invades South Korea

  • UN forces push North Korea to Yalu River- the border with China (1950)

  • • Chinese forces cross Yalu and enter Korean War

  • Ethel and Julius Rosenberg Execution

    Ethel and Julius Rosenberg Execution
    On this day in 1953, Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, who were convicted of conspiring to pass U.S. atomic secrets to the Soviets, are executed at Sing Sing Prison in Ossining, New York.
  • • Armistice Signed

  • • Ho Chi Minh Established Communist Rule in Vietnam (1954)

    •	Ho Chi Minh Established Communist Rule in Vietnam (1954)
    Hồ Chí Minh led the Việt Minh independence movement from 1941 onward, establishing the Communist-ruled Democratic Republic of Vietnam in 1945 and defeating the French Union in 1954 at the battle of Điện Biên Phủ. He officially stepped down from power in 1965 due to health problems.
  • • Hernandez v. Texas

    •	Hernandez v. Texas
    Hernandez v. Texas, 347 U.S. 475 (1954) was a landmark case, "the first and only Mexican-American civil-rights case heard and decided by the United States Supreme Court during the post-World War II period."
  • • Brown v. Board of Education

    •	Brown v. Board of Education
    May 17, 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously (9–0) that racial segregation in public schools violated the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution, which prohibits the states from denying equal protection of the laws to any person within their jurisdictions.
  • Warsaw Pact Formed

    Warsaw Pact Formed
    The Warsaw Treaty Organization (also known as the Warsaw Pact) was a political and military alliance established on May 14, 1955 between the Soviet Union and several Eastern European countries.
  • • Polio Vaccine

    •	Polio Vaccine
    Mild redness or pain may occur at the site of injection. Oral polio vaccines cause about three cases of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis per million doses given. ... The first polio vaccine was the inactivated polio vaccine. It was developed by Jonas Salk and came into use in 1955.
  • • Rosa Parks Arrested

    •	Rosa Parks Arrested
    On 1 December 1955, Rosa Parks was arrested for refusing to give up her seat to a white passenger on a city bus in Montgomery, Alabama. This single act of nonviolent resistance sparked the Montgomery bus boycott, an eleven-month struggle to desegregate the city's buses.
  • • Montgomery Bus Boycott

    •	Montgomery Bus Boycott
    Montgomery Bus Boycott (1955-1956) Sparked by the arrest of Rosa Parks on 1 December 1955, the Montgomery bus boycott was a 13-month mass protest that ended with the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that segregation on public buses is unconstitutional.
  • • Interstate Highway Act

    •	Interstate Highway Act
    The Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956, popularly known as the National Interstate and Defense Highways Act (Public Law 84-627), was enacted on June 29, 1956, when President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the bill into law.
  • • Elvis Presley First Hit Song

    •	Elvis Presley First Hit Song
    February 1956. As "Heartbreak Hotel" makes its climb up the charts on its way to #1, "I Forgot to Remember to Forget" b/w "Mystery Train," Elvis' fifth and last single to be released on the Sun label, hits #1 on Billboard's national country singles chart. His first #1 hit on a national chart.
  • Sputnik I

  • • Leave it to Beaver First Airs on TV

    •	Leave it to Beaver First Airs on TV
    Leave It to Beaver is one of the first primetime sitcom series written from a child's point of view. ... The series had its debut on CBS on October 4, 1957. The following season, it moved to ABC, where it stayed until completing its run on June 20, 1963.
  • • Civil Rights Act of 1957

    •	Civil Rights Act of 1957
    The Civil Rights Act of 1957, Pub.L. 85–315, 71 Stat. 634, enacted September 9, 1957, a federal voting rights bill, was the first federal civil rights legislation passed by the United States Congress since the Civil Rights Act of 1875.
  • • Little Rock Nine

    •	Little Rock Nine
    On September 4, 1957, the first day of classes at Central High, Governor Orval Faubus called in the Arkansas National Guard to block the black students' entry into the high school. Later that month, President Dwight D. Eisenhower sent in federal troops to escort the Little Rock Nine into the school.
  • • Kennedy versus Nixon TV Debate

    •	Kennedy versus Nixon TV Debate
    In a closely-contested election, Democrat John F. Kennedy defeated incumbent Vice President Richard Nixon, the Republican Party nominee. ... The 1960 presidential election was the closest election since 1916, and this closeness can be explained by a number of factors.
  • Kennedy versus NIXON TCV Debate

    Kennedy versus NIXON TCV Debate
    In a closely-contested election, Democrat John F. Kennedy defeated incumbent Vice President Richard Nixon, the Republican Party nominee. ... The 1960 presidential election was the closest election since 1916, and this closeness can be explained by a number of factors.
  • • Chicano Mural Movement Begins

  • • Bay of Pigs Invasion

    •	Bay of Pigs Invasion
    On April 17, 1961, 1400 Cuban exiles launched what became a botched invasion at the Bay of Pigs on the south coast of Cuba. In 1959, Fidel Castro came to power in an armed revolt that overthrew Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batista.
  • • Mapp v. Ohio

    •	Mapp v. Ohio
    Mapp v. Ohio, 367 U.S. 643 (1961), was a landmark case in criminal procedure, in which the United States Supreme Court decided that evidence obtained in violation of the Fourth Amendment, which protects against "unreasonable searches and seizures," may not be used in state law criminal prosecutions in state courts
  • • Affirmative Action

    •	Affirmative Action
    In 1961, President Kennedy was the first to use the term "affirmative action" in an Executive Order that directed government contractors to take "affirmative action to ensure that applicants are employed, and that employees are treated during employment, without regard to their race, creed, color, or national origin."
  • Peace Corps Formed

    Peace Corps Formed
    On September 22, 1961, Kennedy signed congressional legislation creating a permanent Peace Corps that would “promote world peace and friendship” through three goals: (1) to help the peoples of interested countries in meeting their need for trained men and women;
  • Cuban Missile Crisis

    Cuban Missile Crisis
    The Cuban Missile Crisis of October 1962 was a direct and dangerous confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union during the Cold War and was the moment when the two superpowers came closest to nuclear conflict.
  • • Sam Walton Opens First Walmart

  • • Gideon v. Wainwright

    •	Gideon v. Wainwright
    Gideon v. Wainwright, case in which the U.S. Supreme Court on March 18, 1963, ruled (9–0) that states are required to provide legal counsel to indigent defendants charged with a felony.
  • • George Wallace Blocks University of Alabama Entrance

  • • The Feminine Mystique

  • • March on Washington

  • Kennedy Assassinated in Dallas, Texas

    Kennedy Assassinated in Dallas, Texas
    John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the 35th president of the United States, is assassinated while traveling through Dallas, Texas, in an open-top convertible.
  • • Gulf of Tonkin Resolution

    •	Gulf of Tonkin Resolution
    U.S. Involvement in the Vietnam War: the Gulf of Tonkin and Escalation, 1964. ... On August 7, 1964, Congress passed the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, authorizing President Johnson to take any measures he believed were necessary to retaliate and to promote the maintenance of international peace and security in southeast Asia.
  • • Escobedo v. Illinois

    •	Escobedo v. Illinois
    Escobedo v. Illinois, 378 U.S. 478 (1964), was a United States Supreme Court case holding that criminal suspects have a right to counsel during police interrogations under the Sixth Amendment.
  • • Civil Rights Act of 1964

    •	Civil Rights Act of 1964
    The Civil Rights Act of 1964, which ended segregation in public places and banned employment discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, is considered one of the crowning legislative achievements of the civil rights movement.
  • 24th Amendment

    24th Amendment
    Poll taxes aboliched
  • • Israeli-Palestine Conflict Begins

    •	Israeli-Palestine Conflict Begins
    The conflict between Palestinian Arabs and Zionist (now Israeli) Jews is a modern phenomenon, dating to the end of the nineteenth century. Although the two groups have different religions (Palestinians include Muslims, Christians and Druze), religious differences are not the cause of the strife
  • The Great Society

    The Great Society
    The Great Society was a set of domestic programs in the United States launched by Democratic President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964–65. The main goal was the elimination of poverty and racial injustice. ... Anti-war Democrats complained that spending on the Vietnam War choked off the Great Society.
  • • Voting Rights Act of 1965

    •	Voting Rights Act of 1965
    This act was signed into law on August 6, 1965, by President Lyndon Johnson. It outlawed the discriminatory voting practices adopted in many southern states after the Civil War, including literacy tests as a prerequisite to voting.
  • • Malcom X Assassinated

  • • United Farm Worker’s California Delano Grape Strike

  • • Miranda v. Arizona

    •	Miranda v. Arizona
    Miranda v. Arizona, 384 U.S. 436 (1966), was a landmark decision of the United States Supreme Court. ... This case has a significant impact on law enforcement in the United States, by making what became known as the Miranda rights part of routine police procedure to ensure that suspects were informed of their rights.
  • • Thurgood Marshall Appointed to Supreme Court

    •	Thurgood Marshall Appointed to Supreme Court
    Marshall was the Court's 96th justice and its first African-American justice. Prior to his judicial service, he successfully argued several cases before the Supreme Court. ... In 1967, Johnson successfully nominated Marshall to succeed retiring Associate Justice Tom C. Clark.
  • • Six Day War

    •	Six Day War
    In 1956 Israel invaded the Egyptian Sinai, with one of its objectives being the reopening of the Straits of Tiran which Egypt had blocked to Israeli shipping since 1950.
  • • Tet Offensive (1968)

    •	Tet Offensive (1968)
    U.S. Involvement in the Vietnam War: The Tet Offensive, 1968. In late January, 1968, during the lunar new year (or “Tet”) holiday, North Vietnamese and communist Viet Cong forces launched a coordinated attack against a number of targets in South Vietnam.
  • • My Lai Massacre

    •	My Lai Massacre
    The My Lai massacre was one of the most horrific incidents of violence committed against unarmed civilians during the Vietnam War. A company of American soldiers brutally killed most of the people—women, children and old men—in the village of My Lai on March 16, 1968.
  • • Martin Luther King Jr. Assassinated

  • • Vietnamization (1969)

    •	Vietnamization (1969)
    Vietnamization of the war was a policy of the Richard Nixon administration to end U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War through a program to "expand, equip, and train South Vietnamese forces and assign to them an ever-increasing combat role, at the same time steadily reducing the number of U.S. combat troops."
  • • Tinker v. Des Moines

    •	Tinker v. Des Moines
    Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District (1969), was a decision by the United States Supreme Court that defined the constitutional rights of students in U.S. public schools.
  • • Woodstock Music Festival (1969

    •	Woodstock Music Festival (1969
    The Woodstock Music & Art Fair—informally, the Woodstock Festival or simply Woodstock— was a music festival in the United States in 1969 which attracted an audience of more than 400,000.
  • • Draft Lottery

  • Manson Family Murders

    Manson Family Murders
    Manson Family. ... They gained national notoriety after the murder of actress Sharon Tate and four others on August 9, 1969 by Tex Watson and three other members of the Family, acting under the instructions of Charles Manson. Group members were also responsible for a number of other murders and assaults.
  • Apollo 11

    Apollo 11
    Apollo 11 launched from Cape Kennedy on July 16, 1969, carrying Commander Neil Armstrong, Command Module Pilot Michael Collins and Lunar Module Pilot Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin into an initial Earth-orbit of 114 by 116 miles.
  • • Invasion of Cambodia

  • • Kent State Shootings

    •	Kent State Shootings
    Four Kent State University students were killed and nine were injured on May 4, 1970, when members of the Ohio National Guard opened fire on a crowd gathered to protest the Vietnam War.
  • • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

    •	Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
    Environmental Protection Agency. ... In 1970, in response to the welter of confusing, often ineffective environmental protection laws enacted by states and communities, President Richard Nixon created the EPA to fix national guidelines and to monitor and enforce them.
  • • Pentagon Papers

    •	Pentagon Papers
    The Pentagon Papers was the name given to a top-secret Department of Defense study of U.S. political and military involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1967.
  • 26th Amendment

    26th Amendment
    18 to vote
  • • Policy of Détente Begins

    •	Policy of Détente Begins
    Détente (a French word meaning release from tension) is the name given to a period of improved relations between the United States and the Soviet Union that began tentatively in 1971 and took decisive form when President Richard M. Nixon visited the secretary-general of the Soviet Communist party, Leonid I. Brezhnev, in Moscow, May 1972.
  • • Title IX

    •	Title IX
    A§ 1681 Et. Seq. On June 23, 1972, the President signed Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, 20 U.S.C. ... Title IX is a comprehensive federal law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in any federally funded education program or activity.
  • • Nixon Visits China

    •	Nixon Visits China
    U.S. President Richard Nixon's 1972 visit to China (officially the People's Republic of China or PRC) was an important strategic and diplomatic overture that marked the culmination of the Nixon administration's resumption of harmonious relations between the United States and China.
  • • Watergate Scandal

    •	Watergate Scandal
    The Watergate scandal began early in the morning of June 17, 1972, when several burglars were arrested in the office of the Democratic National Committee, located in the Watergate complex of buildings in Washington, D.C. This was no ordinary robbery:
  • • War Powers Resolution (1973)

    •	War Powers Resolution (1973)
    The War Powers Resolution (also known as the War Powers Resolution of 1973 or the War Powers Act) (50 U.S.C. 1541–1548) is a federal law intended to check the president's power to commit the United States to an armed conflict without the consent of the U.S. Congress.
  • • Roe v. Wade

    •	Roe v. Wade
    Roe v. Wade, 410 U.S. 113 (1973), is a landmark decision issued in 1973 by the United States Supreme Court on the issue of the constitutionality of laws that criminalized or restricted access to abortions.
  • • Engaged Species Act

    •	Engaged Species Act
    The Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA) was signed on December 28, 1973, and provides for the conservation of species that are endangered or threatened throughout all or a significant portion of their range, and the conservation of the ecosystems on which they depend.
  • • OPEC Oil Embargo

    •	OPEC Oil Embargo
    Oil Embargo, 1973–1974. During the 1973 Arab-Israeli War, Arab members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) imposed an embargo against the United States in retaliation for the U.S. decision to re-supply the Israeli military and to gain leverage in the post-war peace negotiations.
  • • First Cell-Phones

  • • United States v. Nixon

  • • Ford Pardons Nixon

  • • Fall of Saigon

    •	Fall of Saigon
    The Fall of Saigon was the capture of Saigon, the capital of South Vietnam, by the People's Army of Vietnam (PAVN) and the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam (also known as the Việt Cộng) on 30 April 1975. ... The city was renamed Hồ Chí Minh City, after the late North Vietnamese President Hồ Chí Minh.
  • • Bill Gates Starts Microsoft

  • • National Rifle Associate (NRA) Lobbying Begins

    •	National Rifle Associate (NRA) Lobbying Begins
    The National Rifle Association of America (NRA) is an American nonprofit organization that advocates for gun rights.[5][6][7]
  • • Steve Jobs Starts Apple

  • • Community Reinvestment Act of 1977

    •	Community Reinvestment Act of 1977
    Community Reinvestment Act - CRA' An act of Congress enacted in 1977 with the intention of encouraging depository institutions to help meet the credit needs of surrounding communities (particularly low and moderate income neighborhoods).
  • • Camp David Accords

    •	Camp David Accords
    Camp David Accords and the Arab-Israeli Peace Process. The Camp David Accords, signed by President Jimmy Carter, Egyptian President Anwar Sadat, and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin in September 1978, established a framework for a historic peace treaty concluded between Israel and Egypt in March 1979.
  • • Egypt-Israel Peace Treaty

  • • Conservative Resurgence

    •	Conservative Resurgence
    Beginning in 1960, the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) experienced an intense struggle for control of the organization. Its initiators called it the Conservative Resurgence[1] while its detractors labeled it the Fundamentalist Takeover.
  • • “Trickle Down Economics”

  • War on Drugs

    War on Drugs
    War on Drugs, the effort in the United States since the 1970s to combat illegal drug use by greatly increasing penalties, enforcement, and incarceration for drug offenders.
  • AIDS Epidemic

    AIDS Epidemic
    The AIDS Epidemic: 1981-1987. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's newsletter Morbidity and Mortality Weekly (MMWR) makes a reference to five cases of an unusual pneumonia in Los Angeles. The C.D.C.'s MMWR publishes its first description of a outbreak of 41 cases of Karposi's Sarcoma, a rare skin cancer.
  • • Sandra Day O’Connor Appointed to U.S. Supreme Court

  • • Marines in Lebanon

    •	Marines in Lebanon
    Beirut Marine Barracks Bombing Fast Facts. US Marines searching for victims in Beirut eight days after an attack that killed 241 American soldiers on October 23, 1983. (CNN) Here is a look at the 1983 bombing of a Marine compound in Beirut, Lebanon, that killed 241 US service personnel.
  • • Iran-Contra Affair

    •	Iran-Contra Affair
    Iran–Contra scandal, was a political scandal in the United States that occurred during the second term of the Reagan Administration. Senior administration officials secretly facilitated the sale of arms to Iran, which was the subject of an arms embargo.
  • • The Oprah Winfrey Show First Airs

  • • “Mr. Gorbachev, Tear Down This Wall!”

  • • End of Cold War

    •	End of Cold War
    Image result for • End of Cold War (1989
    During 1989 and 1990, the Berlin Wall came down, borders opened, and free elections ousted Communist regimes everywhere in eastern Europe. In late 1991 the Soviet Union itself dissolved into its component republics. With stunning speed, the Iron Curtain was lifted and the Cold War came to an end.
  • • Berlin Wall Falls

    •	Berlin Wall Falls
    The Berlin Wall: The Fall of the Wall. On November 9, 1989, as the Cold War began to thaw across Eastern Europe, the spokesman for East Berlin's Communist Party announced a change in his city's relations with the West. Starting at midnight that day, he said, citizens of the GDR were free to cross the country's borders.
  • Germany Reunification

    Germany Reunification
    The East German government started to falter in May 1989, when the removal of Hungary's border fence with Austria opened a hole in the Iron Curtain. It caused an exodus of thousands of East Germans fleeing to West Germany and Austria via Hungary.
  • Iraq Invades Kuwait

    Iraq Invades Kuwait
    In early 1990 Iraq was accusing Kuwait of stealing Iraqi petroleum through slant drilling, although some Iraqi sources indicated Saddam Hussein's decision to attack Kuwait was made a few months before the actual invasion.
  • • Soviet Union Collapses

    •	Soviet Union Collapses
    On the previous day, 25 December 1991, Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev, the eighth and final leader of the Soviet Union, resigned, declared his office extinct, and handed over its powers – including control of the Soviet nuclear missile launching codes – to Russian President Boris Yeltsin.
  • Operation Desert Storm

  • Ms. Adcox Born

  • Rodney King

    Rodney King
    Born in Sacramento, California, on April 2, 1965, Rodney King was caught by the Los Angeles police after a high-speed chase on March 3, 1991.
  • NAFTA Founded

  • Contract with America

    Contract with America
    The Contract with America was a document released by the United States Republican Party during the 1994 Congressional election campaign.
  • O.J. Simpson’s “Trial of the Century”

    O.J. Simpson’s “Trial of the Century”
    Simpson was represented by a very high-profile defense team, also referred to as the Dream Team, which was initially led by Robert Shapiro[6][7][8] and subsequently directed by Johnnie Cochran. The team also included F. Lee Bailey, Alan Dershowitz, Robert Kardashian, Shawn Holley, Carl E. Douglas, and Gerald Uelmen. Barry Scheck and Peter Neufeld were two additional attorneys who specialized in DNA evidence.
  • Bill Clinton’s Impeachment

    Bill Clinton’s Impeachment
    After nearly 14 hours of debate, the House of Representatives approves two articles of impeachment against President Bill Clinton, charging him with lying under oath to a federal grand jury and obstructing justice. Clinton, the second president in American history to be impeached, vowed to finish his term.
  • USA Patriot Act

    USA Patriot Act
    USA PATRIOT Act, also called PATRIOT Act, in full Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001, U.S. legislation, passed by Congress in response to the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and signed into law by Pres.
  • War on Terror

    War on Terror
    The War on Terror, also known as the Global War on Terrorism, is an international military campaign that was launched by the U.S. government after the September 11 attacks in the U.S. in 2001
  • Alma's Birthday

  • 9/11

    n September 11, 2001, 19 militants associated with the Islamic extremist group al-Qaeda hijacked four airplanes and carried out suicide attacks against targets in the United States.
  • NASA Mars Rover Mission Begins

  • Facebook Launched

    Facebook Launched
    History of Facebook. Facebook is a social networking service launched on February 4, 2004. It was founded by Mark Zuckerberg with his college roommate and fellow Harvard University student Eduardo Saverin.
  • Hurricane Katrina

    Hurricane Katrina
    Early in the morning on August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast of the United States. When the storm made landfall, it had a Category 3 rating on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale–it brought sustained winds of 100–140 miles per hour–and stretched some 400 miles across.
  • Saddam Hussein Executed

    Saddam Hussein Executed
    The execution of Saddam Hussein took place on Saturday, 30 December 2006. Saddam was sentenced to death by hanging, after being convicted of crimes against humanity by the Iraqi Special Tribunal for the murder of 148 Iraqi Shi'ites in the town of Dujail in 1982, in retaliation for an assassination attempt against him
  • Iphone Released

    Iphone Released
    Jobs also had Apple develop the iTunes software, which can be used to synchronize content with iPod devices. ... On January 2, 2007, Steve Jobs announced iPhone at the Macworld convention, receiving substantial media attention. Jobs announced that the first iPhone would be released later that year.
  • American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

  • Hilary Clinton Appointed U.S. Secretary of State

  • Sonia Sotomayor Appointed to U.S. Supreme Court

  • Arab Spring

  • Osama Bin Laden Killed

  • Space X Falcon 9

  • Donald Trump Elected President

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    American Civil War

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    Gilded Age

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    Progressive Era

    The Progressive Era (1890 - 1920) Progressivism is the term applied to a variety of responses to the economic and social problems rapid industrialization introduced to America. Progressivism began as a social movement and grew into a political movement. The early progressives rejected Social Darwinism.
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    Theodore Roosevelt

    Political Parties: Republican and Progressive (Bull Moose) party. Domestic Policy: Squared Deal ( 3 C's ), trust busting, consumers, conservation ( nature )
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    William Howard Taft

    Political Parties: Republican. Domestic Policy: 3'Cs :( . 16/17 amendments
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    Woodrow Wilson

    Political Parties: Democrat. Domestic Policy:Clayton Anti-Trust Act, National Parks Service, Federal Reserve Act, 18/19 Amendments
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    world war I

    World War I began in 1914, after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, and lasted until 1918.
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    Roaring Twenties

    The 1920s were an age of dramatic social and political change. For the first time, more Americans lived in cities than on farms. The nation's total wealth more than doubled between 1920 and 1929, and this economic growth swept many Americans into an affluent but unfamiliar “consumer society.”
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    Great Depression

    The Great Depression lasted from 1929 to 1939, and was the worst economic downturn in the history of the industrialized world. It began after the stock market crash of October 1929, which sent Wall Street into a panic and wiped out millions of investors.
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    Franklin D. Roosevelt

    In his April 28, 1935, fireside chat radio broadcast, President Franklin D. Roosevelt praises the newly adopted Works Relief Program and discusses the new Social Security Act recently introduced in Congress.
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    New Deal Programs

    1933 Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) ...
    1933 Federal Emergency Relief Administration (FERA) ...
    1933 Public Works Administration (PWA) ...
    1933 Civil Works Administration (CWA) ...
    1935 Works Progress Administration (WPA) ...
    1935 National Youth Administration (NYA) ...
    1933 Emergency Banking Relief Act (EBRA) ...
    1933 Glass-Steagall Act.
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    The Holocaust

    The first concentration camps in Germany were established soon after Hitler's appointment as chancellor in January 1933. In the weeks after the Nazis came to power, The SA (Sturmabteilungen; commonly known as Storm Troopers), the SS (Schutzstaffel; Protection Squadrons—the elite guard of the Nazi party), the police, and local civilian authorities organized numerous detention camps to incarcerate real and perceived political opponents of Nazi policy.
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    World War II

    World War II (1939-1945) World War II (1939-1945) was the largest armed conflict in human history. ... Although the war began with Nazi Germany's attack on Poland in September 1939, the United States did not enter the war until after the Japanese bombed the American fleet in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on December 7, 1941.
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    Harry S. Truman

    Harry Truman (1884-1972), the 33rd U.S. president, assumed office following the death of President Franklin Roosevelt (1882-1945). In the White House from 1945 to 1953, Truman made the decision to use the atomic bomb against Japan, helped rebuild postwar Europe, worked to contain communism and led the United States into the Korean War (1950-1953).
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    Baby Boom

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    The Cold War

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    Korean War

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    1950s Prosperity

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    Dwight D. Eisenhower

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    Warren Court

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    Vietnam War

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    Vietnam War

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    John F. Kennedy

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    Lyndon B. Johnson

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    Richard Nixon

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    Jimmy Carter

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    Gerald Ford

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    : Iran Hostage Crisis

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    Ronald Reagan

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    George H. W. Bush

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    Persian Gulf War

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    Bill Clinton

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    George W. Bush

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    War in Afghanistan

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    Iraq War

    The first of these was a brief, conventionally fought war in March–April 2003, in which a combined force of troops from the United States and Great Britain (with smaller contingents from several other countries) invaded Iraq and rapidly defeated Iraqi military and paramilitary forces.
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    : Barack Obama

    He served in the Illinois State Senate from 1997 until 2004. Obama was born in 1961 in Honolulu, Hawaii, two years after the territory was admitted to the Union as the 50th state. ... In 1988 Obama enrolled in Harvard Law School, where he was the first black president of the Harvard Law Review.