Instructional Design Theories & Models

Timeline created by cbaroni
  • Sociocultural Learning Theory

    Sociocultural Learning Theory
    The original work detailing the Sociocultural Learning Theory was written in the early 1930s. These are culture, language, and the zone of proximal development. Pappas, C. (2014, November 26) Instructional Design Models and Theories: The Sociocultural Learning Theory. Retrieved from https://elearningindustry.com
  • Bloom’s Taxonomy Of Learning Objectives

    Bloom’s Taxonomy Of Learning Objectives
    This well-known theory was first developed in the 1950s. Bloom focused on the cognitive domain. This portion of the theory moves up a hierarchy of processes starting at the most basic. These specific processes include: Remembering, Understanding, Applying, Analyzing, Evaluating, and Creating. (Frost, E. Instructional design models and theories. Retrieved from https://educationaltechnology.net/instructional-design-models-and-theories/)
  • The Kirkpatrick Model

    The Kirkpatrick Model
    Donald Kirkpatrick, Professor Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin and past president of the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD), first published his Four-Level Training Evaluation Model in 1959, in the US Training and Development Journal. (Frost, E. Instructional design models and theories. Retrieved from https://educationaltechnology.net/instructional-design-models-and-theories/)
  • Individualized Instruction

    Individualized Instruction
    Keller introduded Individualized Instruction in 1962. This theory centers on 4 key principles. (Frost, E. Instructional design models and theories. Retrieved from https://educationaltechnology.net/instructional-design-models-and-theories/)
  • The Gerlach-Ely Model

    The Gerlach-Ely Model
    The effectiveness of the Gerlach & Ely model of instruction, first introduced in 1971. (Frost, E. Instructional design models and theories. Retrieved from https://educationaltechnology.net/instructional-design-models-and-theories/)
  • The Addie Model

    The Addie Model
    This acronym stands for Analyze, Design, Develop, Implement, and Evaluate. The ADDIE model was first designed in the 1975 by the U.S. Army by the Centre for Educational Technology at Florida State University. It is comprised of the five factors listed above, which helps Instructional Design professionals tackle eLearning projects in stages. (Frost, E. Instructional design models and theories. Retrieved from https://educationaltechnology.net/instructional-design-models-and-theories/)
  • Dick and Carey Model

    Dick and Carey Model
    Dick and Carey first introduced their Systems Approach Model back in 1978. (Frost, E. Instructional design models and theories. Retrieved from https://educationaltechnology.net/instructional-design-models-and-theories/)
  • Situated Cognition Theory

    Situated Cognition Theory
    The Situated Cognition Theory published in 1989. Essentially, the theory is based on the concept that you cannot separate knowing from doing. It also stipulates that learning is a social endeavor that gives people the opportunity to expand their knowledge through discussions and group problem-solving tasks. (Pappas, C. (2015, June 27) Instructional Design Models and Theories: The Situated Cognition Theory And The Cognitive Apprenticeship Model, Retrieved from https://elearningindustry.com)
  • Backward Design Theory

    Backward Design Theory
    The term "backward design" was introduced to curriculum design in 1998/9 by Jay McTighe and Grant Wiggins (Understanding by Design). (Frost, E. Instructional design models and theories. Retrieved from https://educationaltechnology.net/instructional-design-models-and-theories/)
  • The ASSURE model

    The ASSURE model
    Developed by Heinrich and Molenda in 1999
    A — Analyze learners
    S — State standards & objectives
    S — Select strategies, technology, media & materials
    U — Utilize technology, media & materials
    R — Require learner participation
    E — Evaluate & revise
    (Frost, E. Instructional design models and theories. Retrieved from https://educationaltechnology.net/instructional-design-models-and-theories/)
  • Merrill's Principles Of Instruction

    Merrill's Principles Of Instruction
    2002 Merill's theory is based on the different ways that learning can be facilitated. Each phase in the learning process has an important role to play. There are four core phases of learning: demonstration, activation of previous knowledge, application, integration into real world challenges, Pappas, C. (2017, September 29) Merrill's Principles Of Instruction: The Definitive Guide, Retrieved from https://elearningindustry.com)
  • Kemp Model

    Kemp Model
    Incorporating a variety of approaches from a multiplicity of disciplines (Morrison et al., 2010), this model represents an innovative approach to instructional design by virtue of its non-linear structure, and the interrelated nature of its components.(Frost, E. Instructional design models and theories. Retrieved from https://educationaltechnology.net/instructional-design-models-and-theories/)
  • The SAM Model-Successive Approximation Model

    The SAM Model-Successive Approximation Model
    This Instructional Design model allows the Instructional Designer to make changes by performing small steps and multiple iterations. You begin with the short Preparation Phase, where information on the eLearning project is gathered. Then you move to the Iterative Design and Iterative Development where the design is created and reviewed. (Pappas, C. (2017, September 2) Top 7 Instructional Design Theories & Models For Your Next eLearning Course, Retrieved from https://elearningindustry.com)