Migration/Immigration of Peoples:1750-1900

Timeline created by ynot6
In History
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    Rural to Urban Migration in Britain

    The enclosure movement in Britain made farm sizes bigger and displaced thousands of farmers. They moved to cities and more populated areas to find work. This is significant because it contributed to urbanization in Britain.
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    Atlantic Slave Trade

    Slaves from Africa are taken from their homes and shipped to South America, the Caribbean, and North America. Nearly 20 million slaves actually arrived to their destination while many others died on the voyage.
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    German Immigration to the U.S.

    German Immigrants had originally moved to the United States for new , cheap, and available land. Then Germans moved because German modernization forced many of them to desert their businesses. Finally, Germans immigrated to the United States in the later years because of some political instability.
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    Indian Migrations

    During this period of high trade with European powers and other Indian Ocean trading ports, Indians migrated to foreign countries to expedite the trading process or to find new jobs in British colonies. It's estimated that 1.5 million Indians moved solely for trading and working purposes once British rule started.
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    Australian Immigration

    First used as a way to relocate prisoners, Australia turned into a major source of European immigration once gold was discovered. In 1851-1861, Australia saw its larger increase in population with almost 700,000 Europeans making the trip down south.
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    Decrease in South American Migration

    The colonial wars for independence in the Americas led to a decrease in migration there. This led to the stronger independent countries with more defined nationality.
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    Siberia Immigration

    The Russian government moves prisoners and some worker to Siberia for exile or work. The Trans-Siberian railway was built for greater access to Siberia and expediting the migration process. Around 3 million people moved to Siberia in this period.
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    UK Immigration to Canada

    Families from England and Ireland are encouraged to move to Canada by the British government after the War of 1812. Military officers from Great Britain were also told to stay in Canada as a means of populating it after the War. It appealed to many people because of the land it offered to those who came to Canada.
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    Zulu Migration

    The Zulu kingdom expands it territory to neighbooring kingdoms through close-combat warfare. In the process, more Zulu Africans moved to these areas for the sake of the new, larger kingdom.
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    Irish Emigration

    After a series of drought and limited opportunities, millions of Irish people left for the United States. At one point, Irish immigrants consituted for half of all people coming to the United States.
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    Brazilian Migrations

    Brazil opens itself for more migration from Europe. It receives vast quantities of people from central and western Europe such as Gernmany, Prussia, Portugal, and even Italy. Strangegly enough Japanese people also went to Brazil.
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    Rapid Increase in Emigration from Britain

    Low wages, unemployment, inflation, and starvation were common to many people in England partically due to overpopulatiuon. This lead to many British citizens moving from England to the U.S. or other parts of Europe which relived England of population problem and increased significance of the U.S.
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    Immigration to Australia

    Period of high immigration to Australia from Great Britain and other European countries. Hopes to mine gold, good working opportunities, and unclamied land were three reasons Australia drew so much attention.
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    Chinese Labor Immigration to British Colonies

    Chinese immigrants moved to places in need of extra work all over the world. The lack of labor from abolishing slavery created extra demand with railroads and sugar plantatiions. Nearly 180,000 Chinese moved just to British colonies in this period.
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    Voluntary African Migration

    Open labor positions in sugar plantations and other areasin British colonies drew Africans from their homeland. By 1870, 40,000 Africans had moved for labor opportunities.
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    Boer Migration in South Africa

    Dutch Boers treck across southern Africa looking for more land and areas to inhabit. In the process, they got local tribes to join their journey and discovered valuable resources at the tip of Africa.
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    Algerian Immigration

    French conflict in Algeria led to Algeria's eventual control by the Europeans. Poor European settlers, who rushed in to take possessions of Algeria's rich coastlands, numbered 130,000 by 1871.
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    Chinese Migration to U.S.

    Civil War and famine in Chia drove the Chinese to migrate to the U.S. to be part of the Gold Rush. Chinese immigration fuled the creation of the Transcontinental Railroad as they would work harder for less pay than Americans. However, federal law stoped their immigration in 1882.
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    Japanese to Canada Migrations

    Emperor Meji of Japan sent some of his people to observe Canada. Japan was crowded, so when the Japanese people saw how open Canda was some decided to migrate there. However, many faced hard times because they were seen as undersirable by the British who ruled the area.
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    Japanese Migration to Hawaii

    Japenese citizens were being hindered through unenployment, bankruptcies and civil disorders. The boom in the Hawaiian sugar industry attracted them to Hawaii. Some eventually moved to the U.S. mainland.
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    Italian Immigration to the US

    In this period and into the early 1900s, around 12. 4 million Italians move from Italy to the United States. The reason for this is an unfair, unified state that gave a bigger burden to Italians in the south.
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    Jewish Migration from Russia

    Because of major anti-semitic movements and periodic pogroms, Jewish refugees fled from Russia. They mostly went to the US or other European countries, but even there they still faced persecution.
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    Ellis Island Migrations

    Beginning in 1892 with its opening, 12 million people entered the U.S. through Ellis Island, an island off the bay of New York. It allowed efficiant passage for new immagrants from Europe.